Laboratory transferability of optimally shaped laser pulses for quantum control

Katharine Moore Tibbetts, Xi Xing, Herschel Albert Rabitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Optimal control experiments can readily identify effective shaped laser pulses, or "photonic reagents,"that achieve a wide variety of objectives. An important additional practical desire is for photonic reagent prescriptions to produce good, if not optimal, objective yields when transferred to a different system or laboratory. Building on general experience in chemistry, the hope is that transferred photonic reagent prescriptions may remain functional even though all features of a shaped pulse profile at the sample typically cannot be reproduced exactly. As a specific example, we assess the potential for transferring optimal photonic reagents for the objective of optimizing a ratio of photoproduct ions from a family of halomethanes through three related experiments. First, applying the same set of photonic reagents with systematically varying second- and third-order chirp on both laser systems generated similar shapes of the associated control landscape (i.e., relation between the objective yield and the variables describing the photonic reagents). Second, optimal photonic reagents obtained from the first laser system were found to still produce near optimal yields on the second laser system. Third, transferring a collection of photonic reagents optimized on the first laser system to the second laser system reproduced systematic trends in photoproduct yields upon interaction with the homologous chemical family. These three transfers of photonic reagents are demonstrated to be successful upon paying reasonable attention to overall laser system characteristics. The ability to transfer photonic reagents from one laser system to another is analogous to well-established utilitarian operating procedures with traditional chemical reagents. The practical implications of the present results for experimental quantum control are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number074302
JournalJournal of Chemical Physics
Volume140
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 21 2014

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reagents
Laser pulses
Photonics
photonics
pulses
lasers
Lasers
optimal control
chirp
Experiments
Ions
chemistry
trends
profiles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

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Laboratory transferability of optimally shaped laser pulses for quantum control. / Moore Tibbetts, Katharine; Xing, Xi; Rabitz, Herschel Albert.

In: Journal of Chemical Physics, Vol. 140, No. 7, 074302, 21.02.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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