Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the inner-city hospital

D. H. Livingston, D. M. Capko, J. Elcavgae, S. Raina, G. W. Machiedo, B. F. Rush

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LCCY) has become the treatment of choice for patients undergoing elective CCY. Inner-city hospitals treat a large number of patients with advanced or acute disease, and the ability to perform LCCY in this patient population is unclear. The records of the first 107 patients undergoing LCCY were reviewed. There were 96 women and 11 men with a mean age of 42 years (range 14-86 years). Twenty-seven (42%) of the patients were admitted through the emergency room and were operated upon urgently, whereas 35 (58%) underwent elective LCCY. More than two- thirds of the patients were either uninsured or covered by Medicaid. In the urgent group, 38% had gallstone pancreatitis, 41% had abnormal LFTs, and 26% had a WBC >13,000. A total of 70% of these patients were discharged within 48 hours after LCCY. The conversion rate was 9% and was similar between urgent and elective LCCY. In summary, acute biliary tract pathology accounted for one-half of the patients undergoing LCCY in our hospital. In conclusion, LCCY can be performed in this group of patients with low morbidity, especially if the need for liberal conversion to open CCY is recognized.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)971-974
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume60
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 1994

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Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy
Urban Hospitals
Medicaid
Biliary Tract
Gallstones
Acute Disease
Pancreatitis
Hospital Emergency Service
Pathology
Morbidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Livingston, D. H., Capko, D. M., Elcavgae, J., Raina, S., Machiedo, G. W., & Rush, B. F. (1994). Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the inner-city hospital. American Surgeon, 60(12), 971-974.
Livingston, D. H. ; Capko, D. M. ; Elcavgae, J. ; Raina, S. ; Machiedo, G. W. ; Rush, B. F. / Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the inner-city hospital. In: American Surgeon. 1994 ; Vol. 60, No. 12. pp. 971-974.
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Livingston, DH, Capko, DM, Elcavgae, J, Raina, S, Machiedo, GW & Rush, BF 1994, 'Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the inner-city hospital', American Surgeon, vol. 60, no. 12, pp. 971-974.

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the inner-city hospital. / Livingston, D. H.; Capko, D. M.; Elcavgae, J.; Raina, S.; Machiedo, G. W.; Rush, B. F.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 60, No. 12, 01.12.1994, p. 971-974.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Livingston DH, Capko DM, Elcavgae J, Raina S, Machiedo GW, Rush BF. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the inner-city hospital. American Surgeon. 1994 Dec 1;60(12):971-974.