Late-training amnesic deficits in probabilistic category learning

A neurocomputational analysis

Mark Gluck, Lindsay M. Oliver, Catherine Myers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Building upon earlier behavioral models of animal and human learning, we explore how a psychobiological model of animal conditioning can be applied to amnesic category learning. In particular, we show that the late-training deficit found in Knowlton, Squire, and Gluck's 1994 study of amnesic category learning can be understood as a natural consequence of Gluck and Myers's (1993) theory of hippocampal-region function, a theory that has heretofore been applied only to studies of animal learning. When applied to Knowlton et al.'s category learning task, Gluck and Myers's model assumes that the hippocampal region induces new stimulus representations over multiple training trials that reflect stimulus-stimulus regularities in the training set. As such, the model expects an advantage for control subjects over hippocampal-damaged amnesic patients only later in training when control subjects have developed new hippocampal-dependent stimulus representations; in contrast, both groups are expected to show equivalent performance early in training. A potentially analogous early/late distinction is described for animal studies of stimulus generalization. Our analyses suggest that careful comparisons between early and late-training differences in learning may be an important factor in understanding amnesia and the neural bases of both animal and human learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)326-340
Number of pages15
JournalLearning and Memory
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

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Learning
Animal Models
Stimulus Generalization
Amnesia

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

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Late-training amnesic deficits in probabilistic category learning : A neurocomputational analysis. / Gluck, Mark; Oliver, Lindsay M.; Myers, Catherine.

In: Learning and Memory, Vol. 3, No. 4, 01.01.1996, p. 326-340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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