Making the World Work with Microcomputers

A Learning Prosthesis for Handicapped Infants

Richard P. Brinker, Michael Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The contingency intervention system based upon an Apple II microcomputer is described. The purpose of the contingency intervention system is to (a) foster a generalized expectancy that the world is controllable and (b) lead the infant to use specific behavioral movements to explore the contingencies available. The use of the microcomputer to sensitively modify contingencies based upon continued analysis of the infant's movements is described. Finally, data from the performance of three Down's Syndrome infants (CA 3 to 6 months; MA 2 to 5 months) and one 10 weeks premature infant (CA 5 months, [uncorrected] MA 2 months) are presented. The use of the microcomputer as a behavioral microscope in infant intervention is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-170
Number of pages8
JournalExceptional Children
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1982

Fingerprint

handicapped
microcomputer
Microcomputers
Disabled Persons
Prostheses and Implants
infant
contingency
Learning
learning
Malus
Down Syndrome
Premature Infants
performance
6-hydroxy-7-methoxyphthalide

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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Making the World Work with Microcomputers : A Learning Prosthesis for Handicapped Infants. / Brinker, Richard P.; Lewis, Michael.

In: Exceptional Children, Vol. 49, No. 2, 01.01.1982, p. 163-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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