Management of venous thromboembolism and the potential to impact overall survival in patients with cancer

Biren Saraiya, Susan Goodin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with cancer is 6-12-fold higher than in the general population, and VTE is the second leading cause of death in this population, after cancer itself. The etiology underlying the increased risk of VTE is multifactorial and complex, involving patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors. In patients with cancer, cumulative results from studies in those with VTE versus without VTE suggest that anticoagulation therapy, particularly with low-molecular-weight heparins, prevents morbidity and may reduce mortality. Despite the availability of effective and safe therapeutic options, VTE is often underrecognized and suboptimally managed. Interventions such as assessing individual patient risk of VTE, providing VTE prophylaxis and/or prompt treatment, and adopting VTE guidelines are essential aspects of cancer-related care. Aggressive VTE management and strategies are critical to improving survival in patients with cancer and VTE.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1344-1356
Number of pages13
JournalPharmacotherapy
Volume29
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Keywords

  • Anticoagulation therapy
  • Cancer
  • Low-molecular-weight heparin
  • Survival
  • Unfractionated heparin
  • Venous thromboembolism

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