Micro and nanopore structures for biological applications

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The power of micromachining of structures in silicon is now beginning to be fully exploited in biotechnology. Examples of what kinds of structures can be made and their applications are given. The parameters necessary for successful separation and fabrication of sufficiently small structures for sequencing are developed. Cell Fractionation from Whole Blood Although most micromachined structures use silicon as the substrate, this material poses problems for biological materials because it can adhere irreversibly to objects such as white blood cells. The Protein Folding project which uses a combination of micro-scale structures, hydrodynamic focusing and diffusional mixing to achieve microsecond mixing times of renaturing solvents with a denatured protein solution is described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages1303-1305
Number of pages3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997
EventProceedings of the 1997 International Conference on Solid-State Sensors and Actuators. Part 2 (of 2) - Chicago, IL, USA
Duration: Jun 16 1997Jun 19 1997

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1997 International Conference on Solid-State Sensors and Actuators. Part 2 (of 2)
CityChicago, IL, USA
Period6/16/976/19/97

Fingerprint

Nanopores
Blood
Protein folding
Silicon
Micromachining
Biotechnology
Fractionation
Biological materials
Hydrodynamics
Cells
Proteins
Fabrication
Substrates

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Austin, R. H. (1997). Micro and nanopore structures for biological applications. 1303-1305. Paper presented at Proceedings of the 1997 International Conference on Solid-State Sensors and Actuators. Part 2 (of 2), Chicago, IL, USA, .
Austin, Robert H. / Micro and nanopore structures for biological applications. Paper presented at Proceedings of the 1997 International Conference on Solid-State Sensors and Actuators. Part 2 (of 2), Chicago, IL, USA, .3 p.
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Austin, RH 1997, 'Micro and nanopore structures for biological applications', Paper presented at Proceedings of the 1997 International Conference on Solid-State Sensors and Actuators. Part 2 (of 2), Chicago, IL, USA, 6/16/97 - 6/19/97 pp. 1303-1305.

Micro and nanopore structures for biological applications. / Austin, Robert H.

1997. 1303-1305 Paper presented at Proceedings of the 1997 International Conference on Solid-State Sensors and Actuators. Part 2 (of 2), Chicago, IL, USA, .

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Austin RH. Micro and nanopore structures for biological applications. 1997. Paper presented at Proceedings of the 1997 International Conference on Solid-State Sensors and Actuators. Part 2 (of 2), Chicago, IL, USA, .