Microfabricated microdialysis microneedles for continuous medical monitoring

Jeffrey Zahn, David Trebotich, Dorian Liepmann

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Enzyme based biosensors suffer from loss of activity and sensitivity through a variety of processes. One major reason for the loss is through large molecular weight proteins settling onto the sensor and affecting sensor signal stability and disrupting enzyme function. One way to minimize loss of sensor activity is to filter ont large molecular weight compounds before sensing small biochemicals such as glucose. A novel microdialysis microneedle is introduced that is capable of excluding large MW compounds based on size. Preliminary experimental evidence of membrane permeability is shown, as well as diffusion and permeability modeling. Solutions should be able to equilibrate across the microdialysis membrane in a few seconds, as opposed to a few minutes with existing technologies. Microdialysis microneedles present an attractive first step towards decreasing size, patient discomfort and energy consumption of portable medical monitors over existing technologies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication1st Annual International IEEE-EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages375-380
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)0780366034, 9780780366039
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000
Externally publishedYes
Event1st Annual International IEEE-EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology, MMB 2000 - Lyon, France
Duration: Oct 12 2000Oct 14 2000

Other

Other1st Annual International IEEE-EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology, MMB 2000
CountryFrance
CityLyon
Period10/12/0010/14/00

Fingerprint

Patient monitoring
Sensors
Enzymes
Molecular weight
Membranes
Biosensors
Glucose
Energy utilization
Proteins
Microdialysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Zahn, J., Trebotich, D., & Liepmann, D. (2000). Microfabricated microdialysis microneedles for continuous medical monitoring. In 1st Annual International IEEE-EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings (pp. 375-380). [893809] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/MMB.2000.893809
Zahn, Jeffrey ; Trebotich, David ; Liepmann, Dorian. / Microfabricated microdialysis microneedles for continuous medical monitoring. 1st Annual International IEEE-EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2000. pp. 375-380
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Zahn, J, Trebotich, D & Liepmann, D 2000, Microfabricated microdialysis microneedles for continuous medical monitoring. in 1st Annual International IEEE-EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings., 893809, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 375-380, 1st Annual International IEEE-EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology, MMB 2000, Lyon, France, 10/12/00. https://doi.org/10.1109/MMB.2000.893809

Microfabricated microdialysis microneedles for continuous medical monitoring. / Zahn, Jeffrey; Trebotich, David; Liepmann, Dorian.

1st Annual International IEEE-EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2000. p. 375-380 893809.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Zahn J, Trebotich D, Liepmann D. Microfabricated microdialysis microneedles for continuous medical monitoring. In 1st Annual International IEEE-EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2000. p. 375-380. 893809 https://doi.org/10.1109/MMB.2000.893809