Mindfulness-based stress reduction is associated with improved glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus: A pilot study

Steven Rosenzweig, Diane K. Reibel, Jeffrey M. Greeson, Joel S. Edman, Samar A. Jasser, Kathy D. McMearty, Barry J. Goldstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

143 Scopus citations

Abstract

Context • Psychological distress is linked with impaired glycemic control among diabetics. Objective • Estimate changes in glycemic control, weight, blood pressure, and stress-related psychological symptoms in patients with type 2 diabetes participating in a standard Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program. Design • Prospective, observational study. Setting • Academic health center. Patients • Adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Interventions • Participation in MBSR program for heterogeneous patient population. Diet and exercise regimens held constant. Main Outcome Measures • Glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HA1c), blood pressure, body weight, and Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (anxiety, depression, somatization, and general psychological distress scores). Results • Eleven of 14 patients completed the intervention. At 1 month follow-up, HA1c was reduced by 0.48% (P=.03), and mean arterial pressure was reduced by 6 mmHg (P=.009). Body weight did not change. A decrease in measures of depression, anxiety, and general psychological distress was observed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-38
Number of pages3
JournalAlternative Therapies in Health and Medicine
Volume13
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

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