Modeling long-term degradation due to moisture and oxygen in polymeric matrix composites

Yunn Tzu Yu, Kishore Pochiraju

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Exposure to elements, such as moisture, oxygen and nitrogen, in the environment is deleterious to the constituents of a polymeric matrix composite. This environmental degradation is accelerated under high stress conditions and at high temperatures and humidity. Modeling the long-term degradation of a polymeric composite requires consideration of the constituent phase (fiber and matrix) degradation, interphase properties and damage evolution kinetics. The fundamental physical mechanisms controlling the environmental degradation are small molecule (particularly moisture and oxygen) diffusion behavior in the matrix, fiber and fiber-matrix interphase, the damage evolution kinetics and its interaction with the diffusion behavior, and the mechanical and chemical stability (reactivity) of the fiber and matrix phases with the gaseous penetrant. A model that enables long-term simulation of gaseous element diffusion and determine the role of fiber-matrix interphase on the effective diffusivity in the composite is presented in this paper. Three-dimensional finite element methods are used to model representative volume elements and consider anisotropic material behavior in all the phases. Particular attention is paid to the fiber-matrix interphase region and its influence on the moisture diffusion behavior in composites. Numerical simulations and selected correlations with experimental results are presented. Most results pertain to composites with the PMR-15 matrix.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)162-165
Number of pages4
JournalMaterials Science and Engineering A
Volume498
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 20 2008

Fingerprint

moisture
Moisture
degradation
Oxygen
Degradation
composite materials
Composite materials
oxygen
matrices
fibers
Fibers
Weathering
penetrants
damage
Kinetics
Mechanical stability
Chemical stability
kinetics
Chemical elements
diffusivity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

@article{e38dd62d1bec4ac791bcc2bbfefd13d5,
title = "Modeling long-term degradation due to moisture and oxygen in polymeric matrix composites",
abstract = "Exposure to elements, such as moisture, oxygen and nitrogen, in the environment is deleterious to the constituents of a polymeric matrix composite. This environmental degradation is accelerated under high stress conditions and at high temperatures and humidity. Modeling the long-term degradation of a polymeric composite requires consideration of the constituent phase (fiber and matrix) degradation, interphase properties and damage evolution kinetics. The fundamental physical mechanisms controlling the environmental degradation are small molecule (particularly moisture and oxygen) diffusion behavior in the matrix, fiber and fiber-matrix interphase, the damage evolution kinetics and its interaction with the diffusion behavior, and the mechanical and chemical stability (reactivity) of the fiber and matrix phases with the gaseous penetrant. A model that enables long-term simulation of gaseous element diffusion and determine the role of fiber-matrix interphase on the effective diffusivity in the composite is presented in this paper. Three-dimensional finite element methods are used to model representative volume elements and consider anisotropic material behavior in all the phases. Particular attention is paid to the fiber-matrix interphase region and its influence on the moisture diffusion behavior in composites. Numerical simulations and selected correlations with experimental results are presented. Most results pertain to composites with the PMR-15 matrix.",
author = "Yu, {Yunn Tzu} and Kishore Pochiraju",
year = "2008",
month = "12",
day = "20",
doi = "https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msea.2007.10.128",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "498",
pages = "162--165",
journal = "Materials Science & Engineering A: Structural Materials: Properties, Microstructure and Processing",
issn = "0921-5093",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "1-2",

}

Modeling long-term degradation due to moisture and oxygen in polymeric matrix composites. / Yu, Yunn Tzu; Pochiraju, Kishore.

In: Materials Science and Engineering A, Vol. 498, No. 1-2, 20.12.2008, p. 162-165.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Modeling long-term degradation due to moisture and oxygen in polymeric matrix composites

AU - Yu, Yunn Tzu

AU - Pochiraju, Kishore

PY - 2008/12/20

Y1 - 2008/12/20

N2 - Exposure to elements, such as moisture, oxygen and nitrogen, in the environment is deleterious to the constituents of a polymeric matrix composite. This environmental degradation is accelerated under high stress conditions and at high temperatures and humidity. Modeling the long-term degradation of a polymeric composite requires consideration of the constituent phase (fiber and matrix) degradation, interphase properties and damage evolution kinetics. The fundamental physical mechanisms controlling the environmental degradation are small molecule (particularly moisture and oxygen) diffusion behavior in the matrix, fiber and fiber-matrix interphase, the damage evolution kinetics and its interaction with the diffusion behavior, and the mechanical and chemical stability (reactivity) of the fiber and matrix phases with the gaseous penetrant. A model that enables long-term simulation of gaseous element diffusion and determine the role of fiber-matrix interphase on the effective diffusivity in the composite is presented in this paper. Three-dimensional finite element methods are used to model representative volume elements and consider anisotropic material behavior in all the phases. Particular attention is paid to the fiber-matrix interphase region and its influence on the moisture diffusion behavior in composites. Numerical simulations and selected correlations with experimental results are presented. Most results pertain to composites with the PMR-15 matrix.

AB - Exposure to elements, such as moisture, oxygen and nitrogen, in the environment is deleterious to the constituents of a polymeric matrix composite. This environmental degradation is accelerated under high stress conditions and at high temperatures and humidity. Modeling the long-term degradation of a polymeric composite requires consideration of the constituent phase (fiber and matrix) degradation, interphase properties and damage evolution kinetics. The fundamental physical mechanisms controlling the environmental degradation are small molecule (particularly moisture and oxygen) diffusion behavior in the matrix, fiber and fiber-matrix interphase, the damage evolution kinetics and its interaction with the diffusion behavior, and the mechanical and chemical stability (reactivity) of the fiber and matrix phases with the gaseous penetrant. A model that enables long-term simulation of gaseous element diffusion and determine the role of fiber-matrix interphase on the effective diffusivity in the composite is presented in this paper. Three-dimensional finite element methods are used to model representative volume elements and consider anisotropic material behavior in all the phases. Particular attention is paid to the fiber-matrix interphase region and its influence on the moisture diffusion behavior in composites. Numerical simulations and selected correlations with experimental results are presented. Most results pertain to composites with the PMR-15 matrix.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=54349119127&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=54349119127&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msea.2007.10.128

DO - https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msea.2007.10.128

M3 - Article

VL - 498

SP - 162

EP - 165

JO - Materials Science & Engineering A: Structural Materials: Properties, Microstructure and Processing

JF - Materials Science & Engineering A: Structural Materials: Properties, Microstructure and Processing

SN - 0921-5093

IS - 1-2

ER -