Mouse model of pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury

Suneel Kumar, Yuying Tan, Martin L. Yarmush, Biraja C. Dash, Henry C. Hsia, Francois Berthiaume

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Pressure ulcers (PUs) are common debilitating complications of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and tend to occur in soft tissues around bony prominences. There is, however, little known about the impact of SCI on skin wound healing in the context of animal models in controlled experimental settings. In this study, a simple, non-invasive, reproducible and clinically relevant mouse model of PUs in the context of complete SCI is presented. Adult male mice (Balb/c, 10 weeks old) were shaved and depilated. Post-depilation (24 h), mice were subjected to laminectomy followed by complete spinal cord transection (T9-T10 vertebrae). Immediately after, a skin fold on the back of the mice was lifted and sandwiched between two magnetic discs held in place for next 12 h, thus creating an ischemic area that developed into a PU over the following days. The wounded areas demonstrated tissue edema and epidermal disappearance by day 3 post-magnet application. PUs spontaneously developed and healed. Healing was, however, slower in the SCI mice compared to control non-SCI mice when the wound was created below the level of SCI. Conversely, no difference in healing was seen between SCI and control non-SCI mice when the wound was created above the level of SCI. This model is a potentially useful tool to study the dynamics of skin PU development and healing after SCI, as well as to test therapeutic approaches that may help heal such wounds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere58188
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Volume2019
Issue number145
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

Fingerprint

Pressure Ulcer
Spinal Cord Injuries
Wounds and Injuries
Skin
Hair Removal
Skin Ulcer
Laminectomy
Magnets
Tissue
Wound Healing
Edema
Spine
Animal Models
Animals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

Keywords

  • Bioengineering
  • Issue 145
  • Magnets
  • Migration
  • Pressure ulcers
  • Proliferation
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Ulcer grading
  • Ulcer stages

Cite this

Kumar, Suneel ; Tan, Yuying ; Yarmush, Martin L. ; Dash, Biraja C. ; Hsia, Henry C. ; Berthiaume, Francois. / Mouse model of pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury. In: Journal of Visualized Experiments. 2019 ; Vol. 2019, No. 145.
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Mouse model of pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury. / Kumar, Suneel; Tan, Yuying; Yarmush, Martin L.; Dash, Biraja C.; Hsia, Henry C.; Berthiaume, Francois.

In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, Vol. 2019, No. 145, e58188, 01.03.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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