Neural cell adhesion molecule L1-transfected embryonic stem cells promote functional recovery after excitotoxic lesion of the mouse striatum

Christian Bernreuther, Marcel Dihné, Verena Johann, Johannes Schiefer, Yifang Cui, Gunnar Hargus, Janinne Sylvie Schmid, Jinchong Xu, Christoph M. Kosinski, Melitta Camartin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have generated a murine embryonic stem cell line constitutively expressing L1 at all stages of neural differentiation to investigate the effects of L1 overexpression on stem cell proliferation, migration, differentiation, cell death, and ability to influence drug-induced rotation behavior in an animal model of Huntington's disease. L1-transfected cells showed decreased cell proliferation in vitro, enhanced neuronal differentiation in vitro and in vivo, and decreased astrocytic differentiation in vivo without influencing cell death compared with nontransfected cells. L1 overexpression also resulted in an increased yield of GABAergic neurons and enhanced migration of embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursor cells into the lesioned striatum. Mice grafted with L1-transfected cells showed recovery in rotation behavior 1 and 4 weeks, but not 8 weeks, after transplantation compared with mice that had received nontransfected cells, thus demonstrating for the first time that a recognition molecule is capable of improving functional recovery during the initial phase in a syngeneic transplantation paradigm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11532-11539
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume26
Issue number45
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 8 2006

Fingerprint

Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule L1
Embryonic Stem Cells
Cell Death
Cell Proliferation
Isogeneic Transplantation
GABAergic Neurons
Aptitude
Huntington Disease
Cell Movement
Stem Cells
Animal Models
Transplantation
Cell Line
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Keywords

  • Embryonic stem cell
  • Functional recovery
  • Neural cell adhesion molecule L1
  • Neuronal differentiation
  • Quinolinic acid
  • Striatum

Cite this

Bernreuther, Christian ; Dihné, Marcel ; Johann, Verena ; Schiefer, Johannes ; Cui, Yifang ; Hargus, Gunnar ; Schmid, Janinne Sylvie ; Xu, Jinchong ; Kosinski, Christoph M. ; Camartin, Melitta. / Neural cell adhesion molecule L1-transfected embryonic stem cells promote functional recovery after excitotoxic lesion of the mouse striatum. In: Journal of Neuroscience. 2006 ; Vol. 26, No. 45. pp. 11532-11539.
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Neural cell adhesion molecule L1-transfected embryonic stem cells promote functional recovery after excitotoxic lesion of the mouse striatum. / Bernreuther, Christian; Dihné, Marcel; Johann, Verena; Schiefer, Johannes; Cui, Yifang; Hargus, Gunnar; Schmid, Janinne Sylvie; Xu, Jinchong; Kosinski, Christoph M.; Camartin, Melitta.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 26, No. 45, 08.11.2006, p. 11532-11539.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Dihné, Marcel

AU - Johann, Verena

AU - Schiefer, Johannes

AU - Cui, Yifang

AU - Hargus, Gunnar

AU - Schmid, Janinne Sylvie

AU - Xu, Jinchong

AU - Kosinski, Christoph M.

AU - Camartin, Melitta

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