Occupational lead poisoning in Ohio

Surveillance using workers' compensation data

P. J. Seligman, William Halperin, R. J. Mullan, T. M. Frazier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine the utility of workers' compensation (WC) data in a system for the surveillance of occupational lead poisoning, we reviewed workers' compensation claims for lead poisoning in Ohio. For the period 1979 through 1983, 92 (81 per cent) of the 114 claims attributed to lead met our case definition of lead poisoning. The likelihood that a company had a case of lead poisoning was strongly correlated with the number of claims against the company. Thirty companies accounted for the 92 cases; two companies accounted for 49 per cent of these. Inspection by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) occurred at 14 of these companies, all of which were cited for violations of the OSHA lead standard. Comparison of the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes for the 14 companies inspected by OSHA with the 15 companies not inspected by OSHA revealed that OSHA inspected battery manufacturers, non-ferrous foundries, secondary smelters, and primary lead smelters, but not bridge painters, manufacturers of electronic components, mechanical power transmission equipment, pumps, and paints, nor a sheriff's office where firing range slugs were remelted to make new bullets. Neither the number of cases of lead poisoning at a company nor the size of a company was related to the likelihood of being inspected by OSHA. Claims for WC appear to be a useful adjunct to an occupational lead poisoning surveillance system; their usefulness should be compared to that of other systems such as laboratory reports of elevated blood lead levels in adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1299-1302
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume76
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

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United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Workers' Compensation
Lead Poisoning
Gastropoda
Paint
Equipment and Supplies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Seligman, P. J. ; Halperin, William ; Mullan, R. J. ; Frazier, T. M. / Occupational lead poisoning in Ohio : Surveillance using workers' compensation data. In: American journal of public health. 1986 ; Vol. 76, No. 11. pp. 1299-1302.
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Occupational lead poisoning in Ohio : Surveillance using workers' compensation data. / Seligman, P. J.; Halperin, William; Mullan, R. J.; Frazier, T. M.

In: American journal of public health, Vol. 76, No. 11, 01.01.1986, p. 1299-1302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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