Organizational commitment, turnover and absenteeism: An examination of direct and interaction effects

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257 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A three component model of organizational commitment was used to study job withdrawal intentions, turnover and absenteeism. Affective commitment emerged as the most consistent predictor of these outcome variables and was the only view of commitment related to turnover and to absenteeism. In contrast, normative commitment was related only to withdrawal intentions while no direct effects for continuance commitment were observed. Continuance commitment, however, interacted with affective commitment in predicting job withdrawal intentions and absenteeism. The form of the interaction was such that high sunk costs tempered relationships between affective commitment and the relevant outcome variables.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-58
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Organizational Behavior
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

Absenteeism
absenteeism
turnover
commitment
examination
interaction
Organizational Models
withdrawal
Costs and Cost Analysis
Turnover
Organizational commitment
Interaction effects
Direct effect
Affective commitment
Continuance commitment
costs

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

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