Pediatric neuroimaging in early childhood and infancy: Challenges and practical guidelines

Nora Raschle, Jennifer Zuk, Silvia Ortiz-Mantilla, Danielle D. Sliva, Angela Franceschi, P. Ellen Grant, April Benasich, Nadine Gaab

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used increasingly to investigate typical and atypical brain development. However, in contrast to studies in school-aged children and adults, MRI research in young pediatric age groups is less common. Practical and technical challenges occur when imaging infants and children, which presents clinicians and research teams with a unique set of problems. These include procedural difficulties (e.g., participant anxiety or movement restrictions), technical obstacles (e.g., availability of child-appropriate equipment or pediatric MR head coils), and the challenge of choosing the most appropriate analysis methods for pediatric imaging data. Here, we summarize and review pediatric imaging and analysis tools and present neuroimaging protocols for young nonsedated children and infants, including guidelines and procedures that have been successfully implemented in research protocols across several research sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-50
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1252
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Neuroimaging
Pediatrics
Guidelines
Imaging techniques
Research
Magnetic resonance imaging
Brain
Anxiety
Age Groups
Head
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Availability
Equipment and Supplies
Early childhood
Infancy
Imaging

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Keywords

  • Children
  • FMRI
  • Imaging
  • MRI
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Pediatric

Cite this

Raschle, N., Zuk, J., Ortiz-Mantilla, S., Sliva, D. D., Franceschi, A., Grant, P. E., ... Gaab, N. (2012). Pediatric neuroimaging in early childhood and infancy: Challenges and practical guidelines. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1252(1), 43-50. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.2012.06457.x
Raschle, Nora ; Zuk, Jennifer ; Ortiz-Mantilla, Silvia ; Sliva, Danielle D. ; Franceschi, Angela ; Grant, P. Ellen ; Benasich, April ; Gaab, Nadine. / Pediatric neuroimaging in early childhood and infancy : Challenges and practical guidelines. In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2012 ; Vol. 1252, No. 1. pp. 43-50.
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Pediatric neuroimaging in early childhood and infancy : Challenges and practical guidelines. / Raschle, Nora; Zuk, Jennifer; Ortiz-Mantilla, Silvia; Sliva, Danielle D.; Franceschi, Angela; Grant, P. Ellen; Benasich, April; Gaab, Nadine.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 1252, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 43-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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