Positive and negative affective processes associated with firearm acquisition and ownership

Craig J. Bryan, Annabelle O. Bryan, Michael A. Anestis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: To examine positive and negative affective processes associated with firearm acquisition and firearm ownership. Methods: An online cross-sectional survey assessing firearm ownership, reasons for firearm ownership, intentions to acquire a firearm in the next 12 months, and positive and negative affective states was administered to 6,200 U.S. adults (49.0% male, 51.0% female). Results: Mean negative and positive affect were significantly elevated among protective firearm owners (i.e., those who kept firearms for the primary purpose of self-protection) and participants intending to acquire a firearm. Protective firearm owners intending to acquire another firearm reported significantly higher negative affect than all other subgroups. Within this subgroup, negative affect and positive affect were positively correlated. Among all other subgroups, negative and positive affect were either negatively correlated or uncorrelated. Discussion: The intention to acquire firearms and protective firearm ownership are associated with both positive and negative affectivity. Typical cognitive-affective processes may be disrupted among protective firearm owners intending to acquire another firearm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)861-875
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Social and Clinical Psychology
Volume39
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Keywords

  • Firearm
  • Negative affect
  • Positive affect
  • Suicide

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