Privacy management and self-disclosure on social network sites: The moderating effects of stress and gender

Renwen Zhang, Jiawei Sophia Fu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

A plethora of research has examined the effects of privacy concerns on individuals’ self-disclosure on social network sites (SNSs). However, most studies are based on the rational choice paradigm, without taking into account the influence of individuals’ emotional states. This study examines the rolesofstressininfluencingtherelationshipbetween privacy concerns and self-disclosure on SNSs, as well as gender differences in the effects of stress. Results from a survey of 556 university students in Hong Kong suggest that privacy concerns are negatively related to the amount, intimacy, and honesty of self-disclosure on SNSs. Yet a person’s level of stress dampens the association between privacy concerns and disclosure amount and intimacy, suggesting that people may worry less about privacy when highly stressed. Moreover, the moderating effect of stress varies based on gender. This study provides insights into the emotional component of privacy management online.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)236-251
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Computer-Mediated Communication
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 17 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Keywords

  • Gender
  • Privacy
  • Self-Disclosure
  • Social Media
  • Social Network Sites (SNSs)
  • Stress

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