Pulse pressure and human longevity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In exploration of the association between pulse pressure and longevity in humans, 3 hypotheses are briefly discussed: the fetal origin hypothesis, antagonistic pleiotropy, and the telomere hypothesis of cellular aging. The implications of these hypotheses serve to draw a critical distinction between biologic age (aging) and chronological age and, thereby, offer an answer to a question that presently matters most in the field of hypertension: Why has it been so difficult to disentangle the genetic components of essential hypertension and to identify the variant genes responsible for elevated blood pressure in a large segment of the human population?

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1060-1066
Number of pages7
JournalHypertension
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Blood Pressure
Cell Aging
Telomere
Hypertension
Population
Genes
Essential Hypertension

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Evolution
  • Genetics
  • Hypertension, essential
  • Menopause
  • Reactive oxygen species
  • Telomere

Cite this

Aviv, Abraham. / Pulse pressure and human longevity. In: Hypertension. 2001 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 1060-1066.
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Pulse pressure and human longevity. / Aviv, Abraham.

In: Hypertension, Vol. 37, No. 4, 01.01.2001, p. 1060-1066.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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