RCSB Protein Data Bank tools for 3D structure-guided cancer research: human papillomavirus (HPV) case study

David S. Goodsell, Stephen K. Burley

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Atomic-level three-dimensional (3D) structure data for biological macromolecules often prove critical to dissecting and understanding the precise mechanisms of action of cancer-related proteins and their diverse roles in oncogenic transformation, proliferation, and metastasis. They are also used extensively to identify potentially druggable targets and facilitate discovery and development of both small-molecule and biologic drugs that are today benefiting individuals diagnosed with cancer around the world. 3D structures of biomolecules (including proteins, DNA, RNA, and their complexes with one another, drugs, and other small molecules) are freely distributed by the open-access Protein Data Bank (PDB). This global data repository is used by millions of scientists and educators working in the areas of drug discovery, vaccine design, and biomedical and biotechnology research. The US Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB) provides an integrated portal to the PDB archive that streamlines access for millions of worldwide PDB data consumers worldwide. Herein, we review online resources made available free of charge by the RCSB PDB to basic and applied researchers, healthcare providers, educators and their students, patients and their families, and the curious public. We exemplify the value of understanding cancer-related proteins in 3D with a case study focused on human papillomavirus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6623-6632
Number of pages10
JournalOncogene
Volume39
Issue number43
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 22 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cancer Research

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