Region of birth and mortality from circulatory diseases among Black Americans

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Abstract

Objectives. This study examines the relationship between birthplace and mortality from circulatory diseases among American Blacks. Methods. All Black deaths flora circulatory diseases (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, codes 390 through 459) were extracted from the National Center for Health Statistics mortality detail files for 1979 through 1991. Age- specific and age-adjusted mortality rates with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for males and females for combinations of five regions of residence at birth and four regions of residence at death. Results. Males had higher mortality rates from circulatory diseases than females in every regional combination of birthplace and residence at death. For both ganders, the highest rates were for those who were born in the South but died in the Midwest; the lowest rates were for those who were born in the West but died in the South. Excess mortality for both Southern-born males and females begins at ages 25 through 44. Conclusions. There is a region-of-birth component that affects mortality risk from circulatory diseases regardless of gender or residence at time of death. We must examine how early life experiences affect the development of circulatory disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)800-804
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume87
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Parturition
Mortality
National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.)
Plague
Life Change Events
International Classification of Diseases
Confidence Intervals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Region of birth and mortality from circulatory diseases among Black Americans",
abstract = "Objectives. This study examines the relationship between birthplace and mortality from circulatory diseases among American Blacks. Methods. All Black deaths flora circulatory diseases (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, codes 390 through 459) were extracted from the National Center for Health Statistics mortality detail files for 1979 through 1991. Age- specific and age-adjusted mortality rates with 95{\%} confidence intervals were calculated for males and females for combinations of five regions of residence at birth and four regions of residence at death. Results. Males had higher mortality rates from circulatory diseases than females in every regional combination of birthplace and residence at death. For both ganders, the highest rates were for those who were born in the South but died in the Midwest; the lowest rates were for those who were born in the West but died in the South. Excess mortality for both Southern-born males and females begins at ages 25 through 44. Conclusions. There is a region-of-birth component that affects mortality risk from circulatory diseases regardless of gender or residence at time of death. We must examine how early life experiences affect the development of circulatory disorders.",
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Region of birth and mortality from circulatory diseases among Black Americans. / Schneider, Dona; Greenberg, Michael; Lu, Lisa Li.

In: American journal of public health, Vol. 87, No. 5, 01.01.1997, p. 800-804.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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