Resting-state functional connectivity of the middle frontal gyrus can predict language lateralization in patients with brain tumors

S. Gohel, M. E. Laino, G. Rajeev-Kumar, M. Jenabi, K. Peck, V. Hatzoglou, V. Tabar, A. I. Holodny, B. Vachha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A recent study using task-based fMRI demonstrated that the middle frontal gyrus is comparable with Broca's area in its ability to determine language laterality using a measure of verbal fluency. This study investigated whether the middle frontal gyrus can be used as an indicator for language-hemispheric dominance in patients with brain tumors using task-free resting-state fMRI. We hypothesized that no significant difference in language lateralization would occur between the middle frontal gyrus and Broca area and that the middle frontal gyrus can serve as a simple and reliable means of measuring language laterality. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using resting-state fMRI, we compared the middle frontal gyrus with the Broca area in 51 patients with glial neoplasms for voxel activation, the language laterality index, and the effect of tumor grade on the laterality index. The laterality index derived by resting-state fMRI and task-based fMRI was compared in a subset of 40 patients. RESULTS: Voxel activations in the left middle frontal gyrus and left Broca area were positively correlated (r = 0.47, P< .001). Positive correlations were seen between the laterality index of the Broca area and middle frontal gyrus regions (r=0.56, P<.0005). Twenty-seven of 40 patients (67.5%) showed concordance of the laterality index based on the Broca area using resting-state fMRI and the laterality index based on a language task. Thirty of 40 patients (75%) showed concordance of the laterality index based on the middle frontal gyrus using resting-state fMRI and the laterality index based on a language task. CONCLUSIONS: The middle frontal gyrus is comparable with the Broca area in its ability to determine hemispheric dominance for language using resting-state fMRI. Our results suggest the addition of resting-state fMRI of the middle frontal gyrus to the list of noninvasive modalities that could be used in patients with gliomas to evaluate hemispheric dominance of language before tumor resection. In patients who cannot participate in traditional task-based fMRI, resting-state fMRI offers a task-free alternate to presurgically map the eloquent cortex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-325
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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