Results from a three-dimensional, nested biological-physical model of the California Current System and comparisons with statistics from satellite imagery

Thomas M. Powell, Craig V.W. Lewis, Enrique N. Curchitser, Dale B. Haidvogel, Albert J. Hermann, Elizabeth L. Dobbins

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Abstract

A three-dimensional model of the California Current System (CCS) from 35°N to 48°N extending offshore to 134°W is coupled with a four-component trophic model. The model reproduces many conspicuous characteristics in the CCS, including: complex, filamentary, mesoscale surface features seen in the pigment and temperature from satellite imagery; wind-driven coastal upwelling at appropriate spatial and temporal scales; and the close correlation between prominent features seen in pigment and those in temperature observed by satellites (Abbott and Zion, 1985). Statistical estimates of the characteristic spatial scales of variability, as calculated from the coupled, nested model, agree with those previously estimated from satellite images (for both surface temperature and pigment (Denman and Abbott, 1988, 1994)). Model estimates of the characteristic temporal scales of variability, from decorrelation times, agree with those previously estimated from satellite images. Typical model decorrelation times lie between 2 and 4 days, in agreement with calculations from earlier sequences of (Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) and advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR)) satellite images (Denman and Abbott, 1988, 1994).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberC07018
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Oceans
Volume111
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 8 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Forestry
  • Aquatic Science
  • Soil Science
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics
  • Oceanography
  • Palaeontology
  • Ecology
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Atmospheric Science

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