Sanitation, eradication, exclusion, and quarantine

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Figure 1 Relationships among the components of an integrated management system. (Adapted from Fry, W. E., Principles of Plant Disease Management, Academic Press, New York, 1982.) Successful disease management in most cropping systems involves an integrated program that includes cultural practices combined with the use of pesticides (Figure 1). Often these cultural measures are necessary to improve fungicide efficacy and, historically, were the only measures available to farmers prior to the advent of chemical controls. Indeed, cultural methods of disease management were often devised even before farmers knew the cause of the diseases themselves.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEnvironmentally Safe Approaches to Crop Disease Control
PublisherCRC Press
Pages223-241
Number of pages19
ISBN (Electronic)9781351080279
ISBN (Print)0849326273, 9781315892726
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Quarantine
Sanitation
sanitation
Disease Management
quarantine
disease control
farmers
Plant Diseases
chemical control
plant diseases and disorders
Fungicides
Pesticides
management systems
cropping systems
fungicides
pesticides
Farmers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Gould, A., & Hillman, B. (2018). Sanitation, eradication, exclusion, and quarantine. In Environmentally Safe Approaches to Crop Disease Control (pp. 223-241). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/9781351071826
Gould, Ann ; Hillman, Bradley. / Sanitation, eradication, exclusion, and quarantine. Environmentally Safe Approaches to Crop Disease Control. CRC Press, 2018. pp. 223-241
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Gould, A & Hillman, B 2018, Sanitation, eradication, exclusion, and quarantine. in Environmentally Safe Approaches to Crop Disease Control. CRC Press, pp. 223-241. https://doi.org/10.1201/9781351071826

Sanitation, eradication, exclusion, and quarantine. / Gould, Ann; Hillman, Bradley.

Environmentally Safe Approaches to Crop Disease Control. CRC Press, 2018. p. 223-241.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Gould A, Hillman B. Sanitation, eradication, exclusion, and quarantine. In Environmentally Safe Approaches to Crop Disease Control. CRC Press. 2018. p. 223-241 https://doi.org/10.1201/9781351071826