Sequential Cold Storage and Normothermic Perfusion of the Ischemic Rat Liver

H. Tolboom, J. M. Milwid, M. L. Izamis, K. Uygun, Francois Berthiaume, Martin Yarmush

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extending transplant criteria to include livers obtained from donors after cardiac death (DCD) could increase the liver donor pool, but conventional simple cold storage of these ischemic organs can lead to poor graft function after transplantation. Experimental normothermic machine perfusion has previously proven to be useful for the recovery and preservation of DCD livers, but it is more complicated than conventional cold storage, and, therefore, is perhaps not practical during the entire preservation period. In clinical situations, the combined use of simple cold storage and normothermic perfusion preservation of DCD livers might be more realistic, but even a brief period of cold storage prior to normothermic preservation has been suggested to have a negative impact on graft viability. In this study we show that rat livers subjected to 45 minutes of ex vivo warm ischemia followed by 2 hours of simple cold storage can be reclaimed by 4 hours of normothermic machine perfusion. These livers could be orthotopically transplanted into syngeneic recipients with 100% survival after 4 weeks (N = 10), similar to the survival of animals that received fresh livers that were stored on ice in University of Wisconsin (UW) solution for 6 hours (N = 6). On the other hand, rats that received ischemic livers preserved on ice in UW solution for 6 hours (N = 6) all died within 12 hours after transplantation. These results suggest that normothermic perfusion can be used to reclaim DCD livers subjected to an additional period of cold ischemia during hypothermic storage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1306-1309
Number of pages4
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Perfusion
Liver
Ice
Transplants
Transplantation
Cold Ischemia
Warm Ischemia

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transplantation
  • Surgery

Cite this

Tolboom, H. ; Milwid, J. M. ; Izamis, M. L. ; Uygun, K. ; Berthiaume, Francois ; Yarmush, Martin. / Sequential Cold Storage and Normothermic Perfusion of the Ischemic Rat Liver. In: Transplantation Proceedings. 2008 ; Vol. 40, No. 5. pp. 1306-1309.
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Sequential Cold Storage and Normothermic Perfusion of the Ischemic Rat Liver. / Tolboom, H.; Milwid, J. M.; Izamis, M. L.; Uygun, K.; Berthiaume, Francois; Yarmush, Martin.

In: Transplantation Proceedings, Vol. 40, No. 5, 01.06.2008, p. 1306-1309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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