Sexual health screening among racially/ethnically diverse young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men

Daniel E. Siconolfi, Farzana Kapadia, Perry Halkitis, Robert W. Moeller, Erik D. Storholm, Staci C. Barton, Todd M. Solomon, Donovan Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Screening for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is a crucial element of improving health and reducing disparities, and young men who have sex with men (YMSM) face high rates of both STIs and human immunodeficiency virus. We examined sexual health screening among a diverse sample of adolescent YMSM living in New York City. Methods: Between 2009 and 2011, cross-sectional data were collected from 590 YMSM in New York City. Separate multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess the relationship between sociodemographic, psychosocial, and health and healthcare related factors and two main outcomes: having sought a recent sexual health screening (past 6 months) and having a rectal sexual health screening (lifetime). Results: Overall, 46% reported a sexual health screening in the prior 6 months, but only 16% reported ever having a rectal screening for STIs. Rates were higher among ethnic minority YMSM and men who accessed care at clinics. Multivariable results indicated that gay community affiliation, recent unprotected anal sex, and number of lifetime male partners were also associated with seeking a recent screening. Conclusions: Though half of the sample reported recent general screening, rates of lifetime rectal screening are low. Efforts to increase screening may focus on improving provider knowledge and guideline adherence, and educating and encouraging YMSM to access sexual health check-ups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)620-626
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume52
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Reproductive Health
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Logistic Models
Guideline Adherence
Unsafe Sex
Health
Sexual Behavior
Sexual Minorities
HIV
Delivery of Health Care

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Siconolfi, Daniel E. ; Kapadia, Farzana ; Halkitis, Perry ; Moeller, Robert W. ; Storholm, Erik D. ; Barton, Staci C. ; Solomon, Todd M. ; Jones, Donovan. / Sexual health screening among racially/ethnically diverse young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2013 ; Vol. 52, No. 5. pp. 620-626.
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Sexual health screening among racially/ethnically diverse young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men. / Siconolfi, Daniel E.; Kapadia, Farzana; Halkitis, Perry; Moeller, Robert W.; Storholm, Erik D.; Barton, Staci C.; Solomon, Todd M.; Jones, Donovan.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 52, No. 5, 01.05.2013, p. 620-626.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Jones, Donovan

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