Spatial and temporal patterns in metal levels in eggs of common terns (Sterna hirundo) in New Jersey

Joanna Burger, Michael Gochfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Seabirds are excellent subjects for examination of metals because they feed at different trophic levels, including as top-level piscivores, they are long-lived, and many are abundant and widely distributed. In this paper we examine the levels of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium in eggs from common terns (Sterna hirundo) nesting on five saltmarsh islands in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey from 2000 to 2002. We test the null hypothesis that there were no locational or temporal differences from 2000 to 2002. There were significant locational differences in all metals in some years, although the differences were not large. The levels of most metals do not seem sufficiently high to cause adverse effects, although the levels of mercury in eggs of some common terns from the bay are within the range known to cause adverse effects. Mercury in common tern eggs may be a contributing cause to their local decline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-100
Number of pages10
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume311
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 20 2003

Fingerprint

Mercury
Metals
egg
metal
piscivore
Mercury (metal)
Selenium
Arsenic
Chromium
Manganese
seabird
Cadmium
selenium
saltmarsh
trophic level
chromium
arsenic
manganese
cadmium
Lead

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pollution
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry

Keywords

  • Arsenic
  • Atlantic coast
  • Bioindicator
  • Cadmium
  • Chromium
  • Lead
  • Manganese
  • Mercury
  • Metals
  • Seabirds
  • Selenium

Cite this

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Spatial and temporal patterns in metal levels in eggs of common terns (Sterna hirundo) in New Jersey. / Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 311, No. 1-3, 20.07.2003, p. 91-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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