Students' understanding of trigonometric functions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article students' understanding of trigonometric functions in the context of two college trigonometry courses is investigated. The first course was taught by a professor unaffiliated with the study in a lecture-based course, while the second was taught using an experimental instruction paradigm based on Gray and Tall's (1994) notion of procept and current process-object theories of learning. Via interviews and a paper-and-pencil test, I examined students' understanding of trigonometric functions for both classes. The results indicate that the students who were taught in the lecture-based course developed a very limited understanding of these functions. Students who received the experimental instruction developed a deep understanding of trigonometric functions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-112
Number of pages22
JournalMathematics Education Research Journal
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

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Circular function
Trigonometry
Learning Theory
student
instruction
Paradigm
university teacher
paradigm
Teaching
interview
learning

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Mathematics(all)

Cite this

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Students' understanding of trigonometric functions. / Weber, Keith.

In: Mathematics Education Research Journal, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.01.2005, p. 91-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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