Temporal community structure in two gregarines (Rotundula Gammari and Heliospora Longissima) co-infecting the amphipod gammarus fasciatus

Rita L. Grunberg, Michael Sukhdeo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study surveyed gregarine parasites that infect the amphipod, Gammarus fasciatus, to investigate temporal dynamics in infracommunity structure. We sampled a population of hosts for 2 yr from the north branch of the Raritan River in New Jersey. These hosts were infected with 2 direct life cycle gregarine parasites, Rotundula gammari and Heliospora longissima. Infections were separated temporally, with the prevalence of R. gammari peaking within the amphipod population in the fall (prevalence = 78% year 1 and 97% year 2) and H. longissima peaking in early spring (prevalence = 41% year 1 and 52% year 2). Increases in host population density did not significantly correlate with the abundance of these 2 parasites. However, H. longissima abundance was positively correlated with host body weight while R. gammari showed no significant relationship. The mean body mass of amphipods infected with H. longissima was 20.7 6 1. 2 mg, and with R. gammari 8.1 6 0.2 mg, which suggests a sized-based infection pattern. Mixed species infections were infrequent with an overall prevalence of 4.6%. When both gregarine species coinfected the same host, the R. gammari but not the H. longissima infrapopulation size was significantly lower when compared to single-species infections, suggesting asymmetric interactions. We conclude that the observed temporal patterns of infection by the 2 parasites are driven by a seasonal change in host demographics and size-dependent infections. We argue that specificity for host developmental stages may have arisen as a mechanism to avoid overlap between these gregarine species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6-13
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Parasitology
Volume103
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Fingerprint

Gammarus fasciatus
gregarines
Amphipoda
amphipod
community structure
Parasites
Infection
infection
parasite
parasites
Parasitic Diseases
Host Specificity
Population Density
Life Cycle Stages
Coinfection
Rivers
Population
Body Weight
Demography
host specificity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Parasitology

Cite this

@article{558b4a044ad341469c2ce46c9cab9145,
title = "Temporal community structure in two gregarines (Rotundula Gammari and Heliospora Longissima) co-infecting the amphipod gammarus fasciatus",
abstract = "This study surveyed gregarine parasites that infect the amphipod, Gammarus fasciatus, to investigate temporal dynamics in infracommunity structure. We sampled a population of hosts for 2 yr from the north branch of the Raritan River in New Jersey. These hosts were infected with 2 direct life cycle gregarine parasites, Rotundula gammari and Heliospora longissima. Infections were separated temporally, with the prevalence of R. gammari peaking within the amphipod population in the fall (prevalence = 78{\%} year 1 and 97{\%} year 2) and H. longissima peaking in early spring (prevalence = 41{\%} year 1 and 52{\%} year 2). Increases in host population density did not significantly correlate with the abundance of these 2 parasites. However, H. longissima abundance was positively correlated with host body weight while R. gammari showed no significant relationship. The mean body mass of amphipods infected with H. longissima was 20.7 6 1. 2 mg, and with R. gammari 8.1 6 0.2 mg, which suggests a sized-based infection pattern. Mixed species infections were infrequent with an overall prevalence of 4.6{\%}. When both gregarine species coinfected the same host, the R. gammari but not the H. longissima infrapopulation size was significantly lower when compared to single-species infections, suggesting asymmetric interactions. We conclude that the observed temporal patterns of infection by the 2 parasites are driven by a seasonal change in host demographics and size-dependent infections. We argue that specificity for host developmental stages may have arisen as a mechanism to avoid overlap between these gregarine species.",
author = "Grunberg, {Rita L.} and Michael Sukhdeo",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "https://doi.org/10.1645/16-47",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "103",
pages = "6--13",
journal = "Journal of Parasitology",
issn = "0022-3395",
publisher = "American Society of Parasitologists",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Temporal community structure in two gregarines (Rotundula Gammari and Heliospora Longissima) co-infecting the amphipod gammarus fasciatus

AU - Grunberg, Rita L.

AU - Sukhdeo, Michael

PY - 2017/2/1

Y1 - 2017/2/1

N2 - This study surveyed gregarine parasites that infect the amphipod, Gammarus fasciatus, to investigate temporal dynamics in infracommunity structure. We sampled a population of hosts for 2 yr from the north branch of the Raritan River in New Jersey. These hosts were infected with 2 direct life cycle gregarine parasites, Rotundula gammari and Heliospora longissima. Infections were separated temporally, with the prevalence of R. gammari peaking within the amphipod population in the fall (prevalence = 78% year 1 and 97% year 2) and H. longissima peaking in early spring (prevalence = 41% year 1 and 52% year 2). Increases in host population density did not significantly correlate with the abundance of these 2 parasites. However, H. longissima abundance was positively correlated with host body weight while R. gammari showed no significant relationship. The mean body mass of amphipods infected with H. longissima was 20.7 6 1. 2 mg, and with R. gammari 8.1 6 0.2 mg, which suggests a sized-based infection pattern. Mixed species infections were infrequent with an overall prevalence of 4.6%. When both gregarine species coinfected the same host, the R. gammari but not the H. longissima infrapopulation size was significantly lower when compared to single-species infections, suggesting asymmetric interactions. We conclude that the observed temporal patterns of infection by the 2 parasites are driven by a seasonal change in host demographics and size-dependent infections. We argue that specificity for host developmental stages may have arisen as a mechanism to avoid overlap between these gregarine species.

AB - This study surveyed gregarine parasites that infect the amphipod, Gammarus fasciatus, to investigate temporal dynamics in infracommunity structure. We sampled a population of hosts for 2 yr from the north branch of the Raritan River in New Jersey. These hosts were infected with 2 direct life cycle gregarine parasites, Rotundula gammari and Heliospora longissima. Infections were separated temporally, with the prevalence of R. gammari peaking within the amphipod population in the fall (prevalence = 78% year 1 and 97% year 2) and H. longissima peaking in early spring (prevalence = 41% year 1 and 52% year 2). Increases in host population density did not significantly correlate with the abundance of these 2 parasites. However, H. longissima abundance was positively correlated with host body weight while R. gammari showed no significant relationship. The mean body mass of amphipods infected with H. longissima was 20.7 6 1. 2 mg, and with R. gammari 8.1 6 0.2 mg, which suggests a sized-based infection pattern. Mixed species infections were infrequent with an overall prevalence of 4.6%. When both gregarine species coinfected the same host, the R. gammari but not the H. longissima infrapopulation size was significantly lower when compared to single-species infections, suggesting asymmetric interactions. We conclude that the observed temporal patterns of infection by the 2 parasites are driven by a seasonal change in host demographics and size-dependent infections. We argue that specificity for host developmental stages may have arisen as a mechanism to avoid overlap between these gregarine species.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85015251246&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85015251246&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - https://doi.org/10.1645/16-47

DO - https://doi.org/10.1645/16-47

M3 - Article

VL - 103

SP - 6

EP - 13

JO - Journal of Parasitology

JF - Journal of Parasitology

SN - 0022-3395

IS - 1

ER -