Temporal scales in ecological risk assessment

Joanna Burger, Michael Gochfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The process of human health risk assessment (HRA) was formalized in 1983 by the National Research Council to include hazard identification, dose-response analyses, exposure assessment and risk characterization. Risk assessment for ecologic endpoints is emerging as a new discipline. Although environmental impact statements have been conducted for many years, ecologists, managers and policy makers are beginning to formalize the process in terms of risk, and are adapting the HRA paradigm to ecological risk assessment (ERA). In this paper it is suggested that the temporal scales of the two processes differ, and that these differences should be incorporated in ecological risk assessment. Even when HRA techniques are applied to a single non-human species there are temporal variations including: (1) different and often variable life spans, (2) unpredictable lengths of lifestages and different metamorphic stages, and (3) indeterminate growth in some species. When these differences are considered for multispecies assemblages, the impact on the food web will result in exposures of differing magnitudes affecting different species. The challenges for ERA include developing general principles for estimating or predicting exposure to critical life stages of the dominant species in an ecosystem, and establishing the appropriate temporal scales for predicting impacts or evaluating outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)484-488
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1992

Fingerprint

Risk assessment
Health risks
Health
Food Chain
Ecosystems
Environmental impact
Administrative Personnel
Hazards
Managers
Ecosystem
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Toxicology

Cite this

@article{5b5bc0db3914430f9a4493a9f8b29612,
title = "Temporal scales in ecological risk assessment",
abstract = "The process of human health risk assessment (HRA) was formalized in 1983 by the National Research Council to include hazard identification, dose-response analyses, exposure assessment and risk characterization. Risk assessment for ecologic endpoints is emerging as a new discipline. Although environmental impact statements have been conducted for many years, ecologists, managers and policy makers are beginning to formalize the process in terms of risk, and are adapting the HRA paradigm to ecological risk assessment (ERA). In this paper it is suggested that the temporal scales of the two processes differ, and that these differences should be incorporated in ecological risk assessment. Even when HRA techniques are applied to a single non-human species there are temporal variations including: (1) different and often variable life spans, (2) unpredictable lengths of lifestages and different metamorphic stages, and (3) indeterminate growth in some species. When these differences are considered for multispecies assemblages, the impact on the food web will result in exposures of differing magnitudes affecting different species. The challenges for ERA include developing general principles for estimating or predicting exposure to critical life stages of the dominant species in an ecosystem, and establishing the appropriate temporal scales for predicting impacts or evaluating outcomes.",
author = "Joanna Burger and Michael Gochfeld",
year = "1992",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00203814",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "484--488",
journal = "Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology",
issn = "0090-4341",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "4",

}

Temporal scales in ecological risk assessment. / Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael.

In: Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, Vol. 23, No. 4, 01.11.1992, p. 484-488.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Temporal scales in ecological risk assessment

AU - Burger, Joanna

AU - Gochfeld, Michael

PY - 1992/11/1

Y1 - 1992/11/1

N2 - The process of human health risk assessment (HRA) was formalized in 1983 by the National Research Council to include hazard identification, dose-response analyses, exposure assessment and risk characterization. Risk assessment for ecologic endpoints is emerging as a new discipline. Although environmental impact statements have been conducted for many years, ecologists, managers and policy makers are beginning to formalize the process in terms of risk, and are adapting the HRA paradigm to ecological risk assessment (ERA). In this paper it is suggested that the temporal scales of the two processes differ, and that these differences should be incorporated in ecological risk assessment. Even when HRA techniques are applied to a single non-human species there are temporal variations including: (1) different and often variable life spans, (2) unpredictable lengths of lifestages and different metamorphic stages, and (3) indeterminate growth in some species. When these differences are considered for multispecies assemblages, the impact on the food web will result in exposures of differing magnitudes affecting different species. The challenges for ERA include developing general principles for estimating or predicting exposure to critical life stages of the dominant species in an ecosystem, and establishing the appropriate temporal scales for predicting impacts or evaluating outcomes.

AB - The process of human health risk assessment (HRA) was formalized in 1983 by the National Research Council to include hazard identification, dose-response analyses, exposure assessment and risk characterization. Risk assessment for ecologic endpoints is emerging as a new discipline. Although environmental impact statements have been conducted for many years, ecologists, managers and policy makers are beginning to formalize the process in terms of risk, and are adapting the HRA paradigm to ecological risk assessment (ERA). In this paper it is suggested that the temporal scales of the two processes differ, and that these differences should be incorporated in ecological risk assessment. Even when HRA techniques are applied to a single non-human species there are temporal variations including: (1) different and often variable life spans, (2) unpredictable lengths of lifestages and different metamorphic stages, and (3) indeterminate growth in some species. When these differences are considered for multispecies assemblages, the impact on the food web will result in exposures of differing magnitudes affecting different species. The challenges for ERA include developing general principles for estimating or predicting exposure to critical life stages of the dominant species in an ecosystem, and establishing the appropriate temporal scales for predicting impacts or evaluating outcomes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026727847&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026727847&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00203814

DO - https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00203814

M3 - Article

C2 - 1444592

VL - 23

SP - 484

EP - 488

JO - Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology

JF - Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology

SN - 0090-4341

IS - 4

ER -