The effect of microhabitat on inuit habitat selection in Nome, Alaska

Joanna Burger, Michael Gochfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Settlement sites of hunter-gatherers and agricultural groups have been examined on a macroscale where social, political, and environmental factors influence the spatial pattern of settlements. This article examines microenvironmental characteristics of settlement sites in the vicinity of Nome, Alaska, and compares these with characteristics at nearby sites chosen by random numbers. Settlements investigated ranged in size from 1 to 31 houses. Compared with the random points, Inuit settlements were significantly closer to roads and to water, and were farther from high hills. They were on flatter sites with higher vegetation, and were more likely to be located in willow stands than on tundra. Doors faced predominantly in a southerly direction. Sites with larger villages tended to be on flatter ground than those occupied by smaller settlements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)680-703
Number of pages24
JournalEnvironment and Behavior
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

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hunter-gatherer
tundra
habitat selection
microhabitat
environmental factor
village
road
vegetation
water
effect

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

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The effect of microhabitat on inuit habitat selection in Nome, Alaska. / Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael.

In: Environment and Behavior, Vol. 23, No. 6, 01.01.1991, p. 680-703.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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