The impact of fish exclusion on the abundance and species composition of larval odonates

results of short-term experiments in a North Carolina farm pond.

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125 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Under natural conditions, a single small species, Perithemis tenera, numerically dominated a littoral assemblage of larval dragonflies. Censuses of exuvia of larvae metamorphosing from the pond demonstrated a consistent negative correlation between numerical dominance in the assemblage and species-specific size in the final larval instar. This pattern suggested that size-dependent processes, such as vertebrate predation, might structure the odonate assemblage. Exclusion of vertebrate predators from patches of emergent vegetation increased total abundances of larval odonates by an order of magnitude. Dominance shifted from small species to species of intermediate size, especially Pachydiplax longipennis, where fish were excluded. The largest species remained rare and were unaffected by fish exclusion. Four odonate species were facultatively multivoltine, completing larval development within 1-2 mo after colonization of the fish exclosures. Fish exclusion also increased the abundance of large microcrustacea, especially the cladoceran Simocephalus serrulatus.-from Author

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-60
Number of pages8
JournalEcology
Volume65
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984
Externally publishedYes

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farm ponds
Odonata
pond
farm
species diversity
fish
experiment
vertebrates
exuvium
vertebrate
Anisoptera (Odonata)
dragonfly
larval development
rare species
instars
predation
census
predators
colonization
vegetation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

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title = "The impact of fish exclusion on the abundance and species composition of larval odonates: results of short-term experiments in a North Carolina farm pond.",
abstract = "Under natural conditions, a single small species, Perithemis tenera, numerically dominated a littoral assemblage of larval dragonflies. Censuses of exuvia of larvae metamorphosing from the pond demonstrated a consistent negative correlation between numerical dominance in the assemblage and species-specific size in the final larval instar. This pattern suggested that size-dependent processes, such as vertebrate predation, might structure the odonate assemblage. Exclusion of vertebrate predators from patches of emergent vegetation increased total abundances of larval odonates by an order of magnitude. Dominance shifted from small species to species of intermediate size, especially Pachydiplax longipennis, where fish were excluded. The largest species remained rare and were unaffected by fish exclusion. Four odonate species were facultatively multivoltine, completing larval development within 1-2 mo after colonization of the fish exclosures. Fish exclusion also increased the abundance of large microcrustacea, especially the cladoceran Simocephalus serrulatus.-from Author",
author = "Peter Morin",
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T1 - The impact of fish exclusion on the abundance and species composition of larval odonates

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AU - Morin, Peter

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N2 - Under natural conditions, a single small species, Perithemis tenera, numerically dominated a littoral assemblage of larval dragonflies. Censuses of exuvia of larvae metamorphosing from the pond demonstrated a consistent negative correlation between numerical dominance in the assemblage and species-specific size in the final larval instar. This pattern suggested that size-dependent processes, such as vertebrate predation, might structure the odonate assemblage. Exclusion of vertebrate predators from patches of emergent vegetation increased total abundances of larval odonates by an order of magnitude. Dominance shifted from small species to species of intermediate size, especially Pachydiplax longipennis, where fish were excluded. The largest species remained rare and were unaffected by fish exclusion. Four odonate species were facultatively multivoltine, completing larval development within 1-2 mo after colonization of the fish exclosures. Fish exclusion also increased the abundance of large microcrustacea, especially the cladoceran Simocephalus serrulatus.-from Author

AB - Under natural conditions, a single small species, Perithemis tenera, numerically dominated a littoral assemblage of larval dragonflies. Censuses of exuvia of larvae metamorphosing from the pond demonstrated a consistent negative correlation between numerical dominance in the assemblage and species-specific size in the final larval instar. This pattern suggested that size-dependent processes, such as vertebrate predation, might structure the odonate assemblage. Exclusion of vertebrate predators from patches of emergent vegetation increased total abundances of larval odonates by an order of magnitude. Dominance shifted from small species to species of intermediate size, especially Pachydiplax longipennis, where fish were excluded. The largest species remained rare and were unaffected by fish exclusion. Four odonate species were facultatively multivoltine, completing larval development within 1-2 mo after colonization of the fish exclosures. Fish exclusion also increased the abundance of large microcrustacea, especially the cladoceran Simocephalus serrulatus.-from Author

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