The importance of culture in treating abused and neglected children: An empirical review

Judith A. Cohen, Esther Deblinger, Anthony P. Mannarino, Michael A. de Arellano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

There is growing evidence that cultural factors may influence symptom development and treatment referral patterns among abused and neglected children. To date, few treatment out-come studies have specifically examined the impact of race, culture, or ethnicity on treatment response among maltreated children. Those that have attempted to include these factors have typically suffered from lack of clarity of the meaning of these terms. This article reviews the available empirical evidence that addresses the influence of culture on symptom formation, treatment-seeking behaviors, treatment preference, and response following child maltreatment. Hypotheses regarding these findings are addressed, and implications for practice, research, and public policy are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)148-157
Number of pages10
JournalChild Maltreatment
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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