The Intersection of Perceptions and Experiences of Bullying by Race and Ethnicity among Middle School Students in the United States

Nadine M. Connell, Sarah El Sayed, Jennifer M. Reingle Gonzalez, Natalie M. Schell-Busey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Little is known about how ethnic identity influences bullying. Using a racially diverse sample, we examine how within-race perceptions match experiences. We utilize bivariate probit regression to examine the correlation between actual and perceived victimization and bullying experiences. Results suggest no differences in victimization by ethnicity but perceived victimization differed across groups. Perceived and actual bullying differed across all groups. School climate acted as a protective factor against bullying and victimization, but school diversity increased the likelihood of bullying by whites and Latinos. These findings shed light on the importance of ethnic identity in understanding the etiology of bullying.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)807-822
Number of pages16
JournalDeviant Behavior
Volume36
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 3 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Law
  • Sociology and Political Science

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