The problem Of muscle hypertrophy: Revisited

Samuel L Buckner, Scott J Dankel, Kevin T Mattocks, Matthew B Jessee, J Grant Mouser, Brittany R Counts, Jeremy P Loenneke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper we revisit a topic originally discussed in 1955, namely the lack of direct evidence that muscle hypertrophy from exercise plays an important role in increasing strength. To this day, long-term adaptations in strength are thought to be primarily contingent on changes in muscle size. Given this assumption, there has been considerable attention placed on programs designed to allow for maximization of both muscle size and strength. However, the conclusion that a change in muscle size affects a change in strength is surprisingly based on little evidence. We suggest that these changes may be completely separate phenomena based on: (1) the weak correlation between the change in muscle size and the change in muscle strength after training; (2) the loss of muscle mass with detraining, yet a maintenance of muscle strength; and (3) the similar muscle growth between low-load and high-load resistance training, yet divergent results in strength. Muscle Nerve 54: 1012-1014, 2016.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1012-1014
Number of pages3
JournalMuscle and Nerve
Volume54
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2016

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The problem Of muscle hypertrophy: Revisited'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this