The roles of cell Ca2+, protein kinase C and the Na+-H+ antiport in the development of hypertension and insulin resistance

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Abstract

There is evidence that the cytosolic free Ca2+, protein kinase C, and the Na+-H+ antiport cross-communicate with one another through positive and negative feedback mechanisms, thereby maintaining cellular Ca2+ and pH homeostasis. This triumvirate may play a role in the development of insulin resistance - a common characteristic of both essential hypertension and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Circulating cells from patients with essential hypertension and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus demonstrate elevated cytosolic free Ca2+, increased protein kinase C activity, or both, and these perturbations are associated with augmented activity of the Na+-H+ antiport. If present in other cells (e.g., striated muscle cells and adipocytes), these alterations could underlie insulin resistance in essential hypertension and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1049-1063
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume3
Issue number5
StatePublished - Nov 1992

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nephrology

Keywords

  • Calcium
  • Insulin
  • Na-H antiport
  • Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus
  • Protein kinase C

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