The serving temperature effect: Food temperature, expected satiety, and complementary food purchases

Sara Baskentli, Lauren Block, Maureen Morrin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We show that the temperature at which foods and beverages are served impacts consumers' complementary purchases, defined as additional foods and beverages purchased for a consumption episode. Across a series of studies, including field studies and controlled laboratory experiments, we show that consumers choose more complementary food items when they consume or intend to consume a food or beverage served cold rather than hot. This occurs because cold consumables are expected to be less satiating compared to hot consumables. Serving temperatures that increase complementary purchasing may enhance the firm's bottom line, but could add unnecessary calories to the meal, and thus is of interest to both consumers and managers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number105069
JournalAppetite
Volume160
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Keywords

  • Complementary food purchases
  • Food decision making
  • Food well-being
  • Serving temperature

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