The strategic prevention framework in community-based coalitions: Internal processes and associated changes in policies affecting adolescent substance abuse

N. Andrew Peterson, Kristen Gilmore Powell, Peter Treitler, Diane Litterer, Suzanne Borys, Donald Hallcom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Substance abuse is a leading contributor to the major causes of morbidity and mortality among adolescents. Traditionally, preventive interventions in the area of substance abuse have focused on the individual level of analysis, with the goal of changing knowledge, attitudes, and motivations. Recently, however, prevention efforts have increasingly adopted models of intervention that target change across an entire population or community. These innovative models target the conditions of a community, with the intention of reducing access or opportunities for substance abuse while enhancing opportunities for healthy lifestyle choices. The U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration developed the Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) as a structured guide for the process of community change. This paper describes implementation of the SPF by community-based coalitions in New Jersey and presents results of a study on their internal processes and the associated changes in policies and practices of institutions and communities that affect adolescent substance abuse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)352-362
Number of pages11
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume101
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Keywords

  • Adolescent substance abuse
  • Community-based coalitions
  • Empowerment
  • Policy change
  • Strategic prevention framework

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