The use of the removable thin film coating technique as an alternative to traditional decontamination methods to mitigate and abate hazardous particulates

Margaret Lumia, Charles A. Gentile, Philip Efthimion, Mark Robson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article summarizes a study that evaluated a new decontamination technique for the mitigation and abatement of hazardous dust and particulates. Traditional decontamination methods are time-consuming, expensive, can create airborne hazards, and do not always bring the concentration of the contaminant to acceptable levels. The use of the removable thin film coating will increase efficiency, will not generate airborne hazards, will decrease costs, and, with one application, will bring the hazardous dust concentrations to acceptable levels. Qualitative tests demonstrated that the removable thin film coating reduced the amount of visible luminescent dust (a surrogate for hazardous dust) from various surfaces. It also indicated that wherever there were minute scratches, the coating did not remove all of the dust. However, the qualitative tests showed that this decontamination method worked well as a preventative method, protecting clean areas from becoming contaminated when exposed to the luminescent dust. Further investigation was conducted using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and carbon dust. Overall, the SEM experiment demonstrated that there was a statistically significant (p = 0.00007) removal of carbon dust (less than 10 μm in size) from surfaces with crevasses larger than 3 μm. The SEM also revealed that there were some limitations where there were large clusters of carbon dust; in these instances, the coating would tear and remain on the sample surface. One method to resolve this limitation involved adding Kevlarfibers to the removable thin film coating. It was thought that this would increase the strength of the coating and eliminate the coating from tearing when removing large clusters of a contaminant. Unfortunately, this did not alleviate the issue. The use of an engineered textile, saturated with the coating, appeared to eliminate the problem with the coating not being able to remove the contaminant from the minute surface scratches and improved the removal process of the coating.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-130
Number of pages16
JournalRemediation
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Coating techniques
Decontamination
coating
Dust
Thin films
Coatings
dust
Electron microscopes
Impurities
Scanning
electron
Carbon
pollutant
Hazards
carbon
Dust abatement
decontamination
method
hazard
crevasse

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pollution
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Environmental Engineering

Cite this

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title = "The use of the removable thin film coating technique as an alternative to traditional decontamination methods to mitigate and abate hazardous particulates",
abstract = "This article summarizes a study that evaluated a new decontamination technique for the mitigation and abatement of hazardous dust and particulates. Traditional decontamination methods are time-consuming, expensive, can create airborne hazards, and do not always bring the concentration of the contaminant to acceptable levels. The use of the removable thin film coating will increase efficiency, will not generate airborne hazards, will decrease costs, and, with one application, will bring the hazardous dust concentrations to acceptable levels. Qualitative tests demonstrated that the removable thin film coating reduced the amount of visible luminescent dust (a surrogate for hazardous dust) from various surfaces. It also indicated that wherever there were minute scratches, the coating did not remove all of the dust. However, the qualitative tests showed that this decontamination method worked well as a preventative method, protecting clean areas from becoming contaminated when exposed to the luminescent dust. Further investigation was conducted using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and carbon dust. Overall, the SEM experiment demonstrated that there was a statistically significant (p = 0.00007) removal of carbon dust (less than 10 μm in size) from surfaces with crevasses larger than 3 μm. The SEM also revealed that there were some limitations where there were large clusters of carbon dust; in these instances, the coating would tear and remain on the sample surface. One method to resolve this limitation involved adding Kevlarfibers to the removable thin film coating. It was thought that this would increase the strength of the coating and eliminate the coating from tearing when removing large clusters of a contaminant. Unfortunately, this did not alleviate the issue. The use of an engineered textile, saturated with the coating, appeared to eliminate the problem with the coating not being able to remove the contaminant from the minute surface scratches and improved the removal process of the coating.",
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The use of the removable thin film coating technique as an alternative to traditional decontamination methods to mitigate and abate hazardous particulates. / Lumia, Margaret; Gentile, Charles A.; Efthimion, Philip; Robson, Mark.

In: Remediation, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.01.2008, p. 115-130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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