Time-resolved analysis of a denitrifying bacterial community revealed a core microbiome responsible for the anaerobic degradation of quinoline

Yun Wang, Hao Tian, Fei Huang, Wenmin Long, Qianpeng Zhang, Jing Wang, Ying Zhu, Xiaogang Wu, Guanzhou Chen, Liping Zhao, Lars R. Bakken, Åsa Frostegård, Xiaojun Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Quinoline is biodegradable under anaerobic conditions, but information about the degradation kinetics and the involved microorganisms is scarce. Here, the dynamics of a quinoline-degrading bacterial consortium were studied in anoxic batch cultures containing nitrate. The cultures removed 83.5% of the quinoline during the first 80 hours, which were dominated by denitrification, and then switched to methanogenesis when the nitrogen oxyanions were depleted. Time-resolved community analysis using pyrosequencing revealed that denitrifiying bacteria belonging to the genus Thauera were enriched during the denitrification stage from 12.2% to 38.8% and 50.1% relative abundance in DNA and cDNA libraries, respectively. This suggests that they are key organisms responsible for the initial attack on quinoline. Altogether, 13 different co-abundance groups (CAGs) containing 76 different phylotypes were involved, directly or indirectly, in quinoline degradation. The dynamics of these CAGs show that specific phylotypes were associated with different phases of the degradation. Members of Rhodococcus and Desulfobacterium, as well as Rhodocyclaceae- and Syntrophobacteraceae-related phylotypes, utilized initial metabolites of the quinoline, while the resulting smaller molecules were used by secondary fermenters belonging to Anaerolineae. The concerted action by the different members of this consortium resulted in an almost complete anaerobic mineralization of the quinoline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number14778
JournalScientific reports
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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degradation
denitrification
methanogenesis
anoxic conditions
relative abundance
metabolite
microorganism
mineralization
nitrate
DNA
kinetics
bacterium
nitrogen
analysis
library
organism

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Wang, Yun ; Tian, Hao ; Huang, Fei ; Long, Wenmin ; Zhang, Qianpeng ; Wang, Jing ; Zhu, Ying ; Wu, Xiaogang ; Chen, Guanzhou ; Zhao, Liping ; Bakken, Lars R. ; Frostegård, Åsa ; Zhang, Xiaojun. / Time-resolved analysis of a denitrifying bacterial community revealed a core microbiome responsible for the anaerobic degradation of quinoline. In: Scientific reports. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. 1.
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abstract = "Quinoline is biodegradable under anaerobic conditions, but information about the degradation kinetics and the involved microorganisms is scarce. Here, the dynamics of a quinoline-degrading bacterial consortium were studied in anoxic batch cultures containing nitrate. The cultures removed 83.5{\%} of the quinoline during the first 80 hours, which were dominated by denitrification, and then switched to methanogenesis when the nitrogen oxyanions were depleted. Time-resolved community analysis using pyrosequencing revealed that denitrifiying bacteria belonging to the genus Thauera were enriched during the denitrification stage from 12.2{\%} to 38.8{\%} and 50.1{\%} relative abundance in DNA and cDNA libraries, respectively. This suggests that they are key organisms responsible for the initial attack on quinoline. Altogether, 13 different co-abundance groups (CAGs) containing 76 different phylotypes were involved, directly or indirectly, in quinoline degradation. The dynamics of these CAGs show that specific phylotypes were associated with different phases of the degradation. Members of Rhodococcus and Desulfobacterium, as well as Rhodocyclaceae- and Syntrophobacteraceae-related phylotypes, utilized initial metabolites of the quinoline, while the resulting smaller molecules were used by secondary fermenters belonging to Anaerolineae. The concerted action by the different members of this consortium resulted in an almost complete anaerobic mineralization of the quinoline.",
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Wang, Y, Tian, H, Huang, F, Long, W, Zhang, Q, Wang, J, Zhu, Y, Wu, X, Chen, G, Zhao, L, Bakken, LR, Frostegård, Å & Zhang, X 2017, 'Time-resolved analysis of a denitrifying bacterial community revealed a core microbiome responsible for the anaerobic degradation of quinoline', Scientific reports, vol. 7, no. 1, 14778. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-15122-0

Time-resolved analysis of a denitrifying bacterial community revealed a core microbiome responsible for the anaerobic degradation of quinoline. / Wang, Yun; Tian, Hao; Huang, Fei; Long, Wenmin; Zhang, Qianpeng; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Ying; Wu, Xiaogang; Chen, Guanzhou; Zhao, Liping; Bakken, Lars R.; Frostegård, Åsa; Zhang, Xiaojun.

In: Scientific reports, Vol. 7, No. 1, 14778, 01.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Wang, Yun

AU - Tian, Hao

AU - Huang, Fei

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AU - Zhang, Qianpeng

AU - Wang, Jing

AU - Zhu, Ying

AU - Wu, Xiaogang

AU - Chen, Guanzhou

AU - Zhao, Liping

AU - Bakken, Lars R.

AU - Frostegård, Åsa

AU - Zhang, Xiaojun

PY - 2017/12/1

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N2 - Quinoline is biodegradable under anaerobic conditions, but information about the degradation kinetics and the involved microorganisms is scarce. Here, the dynamics of a quinoline-degrading bacterial consortium were studied in anoxic batch cultures containing nitrate. The cultures removed 83.5% of the quinoline during the first 80 hours, which were dominated by denitrification, and then switched to methanogenesis when the nitrogen oxyanions were depleted. Time-resolved community analysis using pyrosequencing revealed that denitrifiying bacteria belonging to the genus Thauera were enriched during the denitrification stage from 12.2% to 38.8% and 50.1% relative abundance in DNA and cDNA libraries, respectively. This suggests that they are key organisms responsible for the initial attack on quinoline. Altogether, 13 different co-abundance groups (CAGs) containing 76 different phylotypes were involved, directly or indirectly, in quinoline degradation. The dynamics of these CAGs show that specific phylotypes were associated with different phases of the degradation. Members of Rhodococcus and Desulfobacterium, as well as Rhodocyclaceae- and Syntrophobacteraceae-related phylotypes, utilized initial metabolites of the quinoline, while the resulting smaller molecules were used by secondary fermenters belonging to Anaerolineae. The concerted action by the different members of this consortium resulted in an almost complete anaerobic mineralization of the quinoline.

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