Toward a civic culture for multicultural organizations

Chao-Chuan Chen, Wayne Eastman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As workplaces become more demographically diverse, there is an increased need for an overarching civic culture that explicitly addresses relations and interactions among various identity groups within an organization. Despite differences in the level of analysis and the standpoints of organization versus subgroup, both the integration and differentiation perspectives on organizational culture are inadequate to address cultural conflicts associated with demographic diversity. Based on a literature review of works by philosophers, political scientists, and educators, the authors suggest that civic culture, which focuses on relational values such as equality and a respect for differences rather than on substantive values such as product quality and timeliness, is an appropriate framework for multicultural organizations. An empirical study found preliminary evidence that people in demographically diverse organizations are more likely to emphasize relational over substantive values and that values proposed for diverse organizations emphasize both differentiation and integration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)454-470
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Applied Behavioral Science
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1997

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Organizations
Organizational Culture
Workplace
Demography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

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Toward a civic culture for multicultural organizations. / Chen, Chao-Chuan; Eastman, Wayne.

In: Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, Vol. 33, No. 4, 01.12.1997, p. 454-470.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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