Traditional, active and problem-based learning methods used to improve an undergraduate biomechanics course

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Biomechanics is a core curriculum course taught in many biomedical engineering programs. Biomechanical analysis has become a necessary tool for both industry and research when developing a medical device. Despite its significance both inside and outside of the classroom, most students have demonstrated challenges in effectively mastering biomechanical concepts. Biomechanics requires adaptive skill sets needed to solve a multitude of problems from various disciplines and physiological systems. Many students taking biomechanics have not taken foundational courses that are necessary for in-depth learning and mastery of biomechanics. Consequently, limiting their ability to solve complex problems requiring strong foundations in statics, dynamics, fluid mechanics, and physiology. Active (AL) and problem-based learning (PBL) are techniques that has been widely used in medical education and allow faculty to implement engineering concepts into the context of disease solving real-world medical problems. This study investigates using both traditional and problem-based learning teaching pedagogy to enhance student learning in a senior level undergraduate biomechanics course. Results of this technique have shown an increase in student performance and self-assessments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEngineering Education
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
Volume5
ISBN (Electronic)9780791852064
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
EventASME 2018 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2018 - Pittsburgh, United States
Duration: Nov 9 2018Nov 15 2018

Other

OtherASME 2018 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2018
CountryUnited States
CityPittsburgh
Period11/9/1811/15/18

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learning method
learning
student
engineering
performance assessment
physiology
self-assessment
mechanic
Disease
curriculum
classroom
industry
ability
Teaching
education

Cite this

Shady, Sally. / Traditional, active and problem-based learning methods used to improve an undergraduate biomechanics course. Engineering Education. Vol. 5 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2018.
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abstract = "Biomechanics is a core curriculum course taught in many biomedical engineering programs. Biomechanical analysis has become a necessary tool for both industry and research when developing a medical device. Despite its significance both inside and outside of the classroom, most students have demonstrated challenges in effectively mastering biomechanical concepts. Biomechanics requires adaptive skill sets needed to solve a multitude of problems from various disciplines and physiological systems. Many students taking biomechanics have not taken foundational courses that are necessary for in-depth learning and mastery of biomechanics. Consequently, limiting their ability to solve complex problems requiring strong foundations in statics, dynamics, fluid mechanics, and physiology. Active (AL) and problem-based learning (PBL) are techniques that has been widely used in medical education and allow faculty to implement engineering concepts into the context of disease solving real-world medical problems. This study investigates using both traditional and problem-based learning teaching pedagogy to enhance student learning in a senior level undergraduate biomechanics course. Results of this technique have shown an increase in student performance and self-assessments.",
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Shady, S 2018, Traditional, active and problem-based learning methods used to improve an undergraduate biomechanics course. in Engineering Education. vol. 5, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), ASME 2018 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2018, Pittsburgh, United States, 11/9/18. https://doi.org/10.1115/IMECE2018-87478

Traditional, active and problem-based learning methods used to improve an undergraduate biomechanics course. / Shady, Sally.

Engineering Education. Vol. 5 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2018.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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