Urban stress is associated with variation in microbial species composition - but not richness - in Manhattan

Aspen T. Reese, Amy Savage, Elsa Youngsteadt, Krista L. Mcguire, Adam Koling, Olivia Watkins, Steven D. Frank, Robert R. Dunn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The biological diversity and composition of microorganisms influences both human health outcomes and ecological processes; therefore, understanding the factors that influence microbial biodiversity is key to creating healthy, functional landscapes in which to live. In general, biological diversity is predicted to be limited by habitat size, which for green areas is often reduced in cities, and by chronic disturbance (stress). These hypotheses have not previously been tested in microbial systems in direct comparison to macroorganisms. Here we analyzed bacterial, fungal and ant communities in small road medians (average area 0.0008 km 2) and larger parks (average area 0.64 km 2) across Manhattan (NYC). Bacterial species richness was not significantly different between medians and parks, but community composition was significantly distinct. In contrast, ant communities differed both in composition and richness with fewer ant species in medians than parks. Fungi showed no significant variation in composition or richness but had few shared taxa between habitats or sites. The diversity and composition of microbes appears less sensitive to habitat patchiness or urban stress than those of macroorganisms. Microbes and their associated ecosystem services and functions may be more resilient to the negative effects of urbanization than has been previously appreciated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)751-760
Number of pages10
JournalISME Journal
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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ant
Ecosystem
Ants
Biodiversity
Formicidae
biodiversity
microorganisms
species diversity
habitat
habitats
patchiness
ecosystem function
urbanization
ecosystem service
ecosystem services
Urbanization
community composition
human health
roads
species richness

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Reese, A. T., Savage, A., Youngsteadt, E., Mcguire, K. L., Koling, A., Watkins, O., ... Dunn, R. R. (2016). Urban stress is associated with variation in microbial species composition - but not richness - in Manhattan. ISME Journal, 10(3), 751-760. https://doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2015.152
Reese, Aspen T. ; Savage, Amy ; Youngsteadt, Elsa ; Mcguire, Krista L. ; Koling, Adam ; Watkins, Olivia ; Frank, Steven D. ; Dunn, Robert R. / Urban stress is associated with variation in microbial species composition - but not richness - in Manhattan. In: ISME Journal. 2016 ; Vol. 10, No. 3. pp. 751-760.
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Reese, AT, Savage, A, Youngsteadt, E, Mcguire, KL, Koling, A, Watkins, O, Frank, SD & Dunn, RR 2016, 'Urban stress is associated with variation in microbial species composition - but not richness - in Manhattan', ISME Journal, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 751-760. https://doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2015.152

Urban stress is associated with variation in microbial species composition - but not richness - in Manhattan. / Reese, Aspen T.; Savage, Amy; Youngsteadt, Elsa; Mcguire, Krista L.; Koling, Adam; Watkins, Olivia; Frank, Steven D.; Dunn, Robert R.

In: ISME Journal, Vol. 10, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 751-760.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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