Video Games Do Indeed Influence Children and Adolescents’ Aggression, Prosocial Behavior, and Academic Performance: A Clearer Reading of Ferguson (2015)

Paul Boxer, Christopher L. Groves, Meagan Docherty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Psychological scientists have long sought to determine the relative impact of environmental influences over development and behavior in comparison with the impact of personal, dispositional, or genetic influences. This has included significant interest in the role played by media in children’s development with a good deal of emphasis on how violent media spark and shape aggressive behavior in children and adolescents. Despite a variety of methodological weaknesses in his meta-analysis, Ferguson (2015, this issue) presents evidence to support the positive association between violent media consumption and a number of poor developmental outcomes. In this Commentary we discuss this meta-analytic work and how it fits into a broader understanding of human development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)671-673
Number of pages3
JournalPerspectives on Psychological Science
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 22 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

Keywords

  • child development
  • media effects
  • meta-analysis
  • video games

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