Visual attention at three months as a predictor of cognitive functioning at two years of age

Michael Lewis, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine the predictive power of various cognitive skills at 3 months of age in terms of later cognitive functioning. Habituating to redundant and recovering to novel stimuli at 3 months of age were found to predict later intellectual functioning at 24 months better than 3-month global intelligence or object permanence scores. In terms of information processing skills, recovery predicted later intelligence test scores better than habituation. It is suggested that changes in cognitive functioning may be viewed as a transformation of skills from one age to another rather than as a continuum of the same skills. With regard to the cognitive abilities of the 3-month-old, it is suggested that information processing may be central to cognitive functioning at this age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-140
Number of pages10
JournalIntelligence
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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