Visual training improves perceptual grouping based on basic stimulus features

Daniel D. Kurylo, Richard Waxman, Rachel Kidron, Steven M. Silverstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Training on visual tasks improves performance on basic and higher order visual capacities. Such improvement has been linked to changes in connectivity among mediating neurons. We investigated whether training effects occur for perceptual grouping. It was hypothesized that repeated engagement of integration mechanisms would enhance grouping processes. Thirty-six participants underwent 15 sessions of training on a visual discrimination task that required perceptual grouping. Participants viewed 20 × 20 arrays of dots or Gabor patches and indicated whether the array appeared grouped as vertical or horizontal lines. Across trials stimuli became progressively disorganized, contingent upon successful discrimination. Four visual dimensions were examined, in which grouping was based on similarity in luminance, color, orientation, and motion. Psychophysical thresholds of grouping were assessed before and after training. Results indicate that performance in all four dimensions improved with training. Training on a control condition, which paralleled the discrimination task but without a grouping component, produced no improvement. In addition, training on only the luminance and orientation dimensions improved performance for those conditions as well as for grouping by color, on which training had not occurred. However, improvement from partial training did not generalize to motion. Results demonstrate that a training protocol emphasizing stimulus integration enhanced perceptual grouping. Results suggest that neural mechanisms mediating grouping by common luminance and/or orientation contribute to those mediating grouping by color but do not share resources for grouping by common motion. Results are consistent with theories of perceptual learning emphasizing plasticity in early visual processing regions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2098-2107
Number of pages10
JournalAttention, Perception, and Psychophysics
Volume79
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Fingerprint

grouping
stimulus
Color
Task Performance and Analysis
Learning
Neurons
discrimination
Discrimination (Psychology)
Perceptual Grouping
Stimulus
performance
Grouping

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Keywords

  • Perceptual grouping
  • Perceptual learning
  • Perceptual organization

Cite this

Kurylo, Daniel D. ; Waxman, Richard ; Kidron, Rachel ; Silverstein, Steven M. / Visual training improves perceptual grouping based on basic stimulus features. In: Attention, Perception, and Psychophysics. 2017 ; Vol. 79, No. 7. pp. 2098-2107.
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Visual training improves perceptual grouping based on basic stimulus features. / Kurylo, Daniel D.; Waxman, Richard; Kidron, Rachel; Silverstein, Steven M.

In: Attention, Perception, and Psychophysics, Vol. 79, No. 7, 01.10.2017, p. 2098-2107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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