Weak and strong constraint data assimilation in the inverse Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS): Development and application for a baroclinic coastal upwelling system

Emanuele Di Lorenzo, Andrew M. Moore, Hernan G. Arango, Bruce D. Cornuelle, Arthur J. Miller, Brian Powell, Boon S. Chua, Andrew F. Bennett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

68 Scopus citations

Abstract

We describe the development and preliminary application of the inverse Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), a four dimensional variational (4DVAR) data assimilation system for high-resolution basin-wide and coastal oceanic flows. Inverse ROMS makes use of the recently developed perturbation tangent linear (TL), representer tangent linear (RP) and adjoint (AD) models to implement an indirect representer-based generalized inverse modeling system. This modeling framework is modular. The TL, RP and AD models are used as stand-alone sub-models within the Inverse Ocean Modeling (IOM) system described in [Chua, B.S., Bennett, A.F., 2001. An inverse ocean modeling system. Ocean Modell. 3, 137-165.]. The system allows the assimilation of a wide range of observation types and uses an iterative algorithm to solve nonlinear assimilation problems. The assimilation is performed either under the perfect model assumption (strong constraint) or by also allowing for errors in the model dynamics (weak constraints). For the weak constraint case the TL and RP models are modified to include additional forcing terms on the right hand side of the model equations. These terms are needed to account for errors in the model dynamics. Inverse ROMS is tested in a realistic 3D baroclinic upwelling system with complex bottom topography, characterized by strong mesoscale eddy variability. We assimilate synthetic data for upper ocean (0-450 m) temperatures and currents over a period of 10 days using both a high resolution and a spatially and temporally aliased sampling array. During the assimilation period the flow field undergoes substantial changes from the initial state. This allows the inverse solution to extract the dynamically active information from the synthetic observations and improve the trajectory of the model state beyond the assimilation window. Both the strong and weak constraint assimilation experiments show forecast skill greater than persistence and climatology during the 10-20 days after the last observation is assimilated. Further investigation in the functional form of the model error covariance and in the use of the representer tangent linear model may lead to improvement in the forecast skill.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)160-187
Number of pages28
JournalOcean Modelling
Volume16
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)
  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
  • Oceanography
  • Atmospheric Science

Keywords

  • Adjoint models
  • Data assimilation
  • Inverse methods
  • Ocean models
  • ROMS
  • Tangent linear models

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Weak and strong constraint data assimilation in the inverse Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS): Development and application for a baroclinic coastal upwelling system'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this