You don't know me, but i know you

The illusion of asymmetric insight

Emily Pronin, Kenneth Savitsky, Justin Kruger, Lee Ross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

People, it is hypothesized, show an asymmetry in assessing their own interpersonal and intrapersonal knowledge relative to that of their peers. Six studies suggested that people perceive their knowledge of their peers to surpass their peers' knowledge of them. Several of the studies explored sources of this perceived asymmetry, especially the conviction that while observable behaviors (e.g., interpersonal revelations or idiosyncratic word completions) are more revealing of others than self, private thoughts and feelings are more revealing of self than others. Study 2 also found that college roommates believe they know themselves better than their peers know themselves. Study 6 showed that group members display a similar bias - they believe their groups know and understand relevant out-groups better than vice versa. The relevance of such illusions of asymmetric insight for interpersonal interaction and our understanding of "naive realism" is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)639-655
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of personality and social psychology
Volume81
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

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asymmetry
Emotions
outgroup
realism
group membership
trend
interaction
Group

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Pronin, Emily ; Savitsky, Kenneth ; Kruger, Justin ; Ross, Lee. / You don't know me, but i know you : The illusion of asymmetric insight. In: Journal of personality and social psychology. 2001 ; Vol. 81, No. 4. pp. 639-655.
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You don't know me, but i know you : The illusion of asymmetric insight. / Pronin, Emily; Savitsky, Kenneth; Kruger, Justin; Ross, Lee.

In: Journal of personality and social psychology, Vol. 81, No. 4, 01.10.2001, p. 639-655.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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